How it all began

In the mid ’90s a young man named Michael Gellman became enthralled with this thing called The Internet. During the infancy of the World Wide Web he emerged as one of the first bloggers anywhere, and developed a following of over 10,000 readers (back then that was a big number). But blogging didn’t pay very well, or at all, so he decided to open a web development firm — a new-to-the-world concept at the time. He called this firm Spire because he figured that in order to succeed he’d need to inspire, aspire and perspire.

Spire’s first client was a group of Samsonite employees who decided to leave their jobs and open an online store that sells luggage. The only problem is that none of them were web developers. So they hired Spire to build eBags — one of the Internet’s original ecommerce sites. It even featured customer reviews, a revolutionary concept at the time. The site was a hit, and the company has since enjoyed a long and successful run. In fact eBags was just acquired for over $100 million … by Samsonite of all companies.

With that early success in the ‘90s, Spire soon emerged as the go-to firm for building exciting new dot-coms. It’s no exaggeration to say we were a major player in the creation of the commercial internet. And then the dot-com bubble burst, and a lot of companies went bust. But Spire hadn’t indulged in the boom-time excesses, so we were in a good position to sustain ourselves, and in the time that followed we really matured as a company. We took what we learned in our early years, and began to apply our expertise to enterprise software solutions.

Today, designing and building software that helps employees accomplish mission critical tasks in the workplace is a core competency. We’ve even built software for bomb squads. Yet, all the while, we’ve continued to advance the commercial internet.

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